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#AtTheKnick

Facts from Episode 2

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While The Knick is a work of fiction, it is based on exhaustive historical research. Below, the show’s writers share some of the true facts of the era that are depicted in this episode

Lucy’s riding the relatively modern “safety bicycle” with two equal-sized wheels – as opposed to the old penny farthing.

Many of the original surgeons in America were barbers, especially during the Civil War. They already had knives and sharpeners.

Eleanor is using the newly invented Kodak Brownie camera – a revolutionary technology that let amateurs take their own pictures.

The Haymarket Dance Hall was the most notorious in The Tenderloin until it closed in 1911.

Cleary is reading from an actual New York Times article describing a night of boxing matches

The Diary of Herman Barrow
May 2, 1900

My mouth continues to throb and ache as if someone was continually driving a railroad spike into my tooth socket. I blame Nurse Monk and her dim witted impulsiveness in the surgical theater. The Edison company left several pamphlets on the use of electricity in the lobby for the staff to educate themselves. Mulkeen will hopefully fix the problem, but once he sees what Thackery did to the junction box on the ward, he may up his price. Thackery can be brilliant but his volatility is quite off putting. He has this ridiculous high standard of how he wants things to be. Having me spending my time bartering for cadavers instead of just using the pigs we have readily available is an absolute waste of my valued time. Perhaps Mr. Speight can introduce me to some of the low lifes that run the indigent houses and I can pick up a body or two for cheap. A lung is a lung whether it comes from a fifth avenue banker or a dirty flea infested immigrant. All the indecencies I must endure on a daily basis. Though I get through each day with the knowledge that it will all pay off for me in the end. Like a good chess player, I must always be several moves ahead of everyone else. And of course at the end of the day, I get to see my sweet, sweet girl. The one and only is this city who truly understands Herman Barrow.

The Diary of Herman Barrow

May 2, 1900

My mouth continues to throb and ache as if someone was continually driving a railroad spike into my tooth socket. I blame Nurse Monk and her dim witted impulsiveness in the surgical theater. The Edison company left several pamphlets on the use of electricity in the lobby for the staff to educate themselves. Mulkeen will hopefully fix the problem, but once he sees what Thackery did to the junction box on the ward, he may up his price. Thackery can be brilliant but his volatility is quite off putting. He has this ridiculous high standard of how he wants things to be. Having me spending my time bartering for cadavers instead of just using the pigs we have readily available is an absolute waste of my valued time. Perhaps Mr. Speight can introduce me to some of the low lifes that run the indigent houses and I can pick up a body or two for cheap. A lung is a lung whether it comes from a fifth avenue banker or a dirty flea infested immigrant. All the indecencies I must endure on a daily basis. Though I get through each day with the knowledge that it will all pay off for me in the end. Like a good chess player, I must always be several moves ahead of everyone else. And of course at the end of the day, I get to see my sweet, sweet girl. The one and only is this city who truly understands Herman Barrow.

thecostumetrailer:

Mirojnick created a color and fabric palette of the different class sections amongst the cast: For the hospital staff, it was lots of whites and blacks (and for Owen’s character, a touch of green, which Mirojnick said juxtaposed nicely with the color of blood). For the high-class philanthropists and wealthy financiers, the fabrics were richer: brocades, laces, silks and velvets.” 

Ellen Mirojnick Talks Costumes on ‘The Knick’

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